Blog Rolls

RealNetworks Launches Free Facial Recognition Tool for Schools

Wired Top Stories - 5 hours 26 min ago
A new facial recognition tool by RealNetworks aims to keep kids safe in school. But privacy experts fear the unchecked surveillance of kids could go awry.
Categories: Just News

Self-Driving Cars Finally Get an Easy-to-Read Rule Book

Wired Top Stories - 5 hours 30 min ago
Inrix's 'Road Rules' platform lets cities compile details about things like stop signs and school zones in a computer-friendly format that any self-driving developer can fold into its software.
Categories: Just News

New on LLRX – The Practice Of Law, Theory, And Our Mess

Via LLRX.comThe Practice Of Law, Theory, And Our MessKen Grady discusses how the lack of a theory supporting the delivery of legal services has contributed to “a mess” in respect to the goal of achieving organizational operational excellence.

Categories: Law and Legal

New on LLRX – Surveillance and Legal Research Providers: What You Need to Know

Via LLRX.comSurveillance and Legal Research Providers: What You Need to Know – Legal research companies are selling surveillance data and services to law enforcement agencies including ICE. Their participation in government surveillance raises ethical questions about privacy, confidentiality and financial support: How private is your search history when your legal research vendors also sell surveillance data? Are you funding products that sell your patrons’ and clients’ data to ICE and other law enforcement agencies? Law professor professor and faculty services librarian Sarah Lamdan’s article focuses on how librarians uphold their privacy and intellectual freedom standards when they rely on surveillance companies for their research resources.

Categories: Law and Legal

Article – My Year of Citation Studies, Part 1

Whisner, Mary, My Year of Citation Studies, Part 1 (Winter 2018). Law Library Journal, Vol. 110, No. 1, Pp. 167-80 (2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3205672

“Scholars have studied the citation patterns for law journal articles from many angles. This year, I’m jumping into the fray, using Law Library Journal‘s “Practicing Reference” column as a forum to share findings from several modest investigations.  I got started when a professor who was teaching seminars for law journal students asked if I could give him lists of often-cited student pieces in environmental law and in IP and tech law (the topics of the two journals). Here I discuss the process for that project and its results. I also take a look at articles. I list the most-cited articles from 2012 and discuss some challenges of studying what each cites—a question I wanted to answer but wasn’t able to. I compare the results from HeinOnline’s ScholarCheck, Westlaw’s KeyCite, Lexis’s Shepard’s, and Web of Science. There’s overlap, but not as much as you might think.”

Categories: Law and Legal

Kilauea Lava Explosion Injures 23 Tourists

A basketball-sized lava bomb slammed through the roof of a tour boat near an active fissure of the Hawaiian volcano early Monday morning, showering the vessel with debris.

(Image credit: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources/AP)

Categories: Just News

FBI Wish List: An App That Can Recognize the Meaning of Your Tattoos

EFF: “We’ve long known that the FBI is heavily invested in developing face recognition technology as a key component in its criminal investigations. But new records, obtained by EFF through a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit, show that’s not the only biometric marker the agency has its eyes on. The FBI’s wish list also includes image recognition technology and mobile devices to attempt to use tattoos to map out people’s relationships and identify their beliefs. EFF began looking at tattoo recognition technology in 2015, after discovering that the National Institute for Standards & Technology (NIST), in collaboration with the FBI, was promoting experiments using tattoo images gathered involuntarily from prison inmates and arrestees. The agencies had provided a dataset of thousands of prisoner tattoos to some 19 outside groups, including companies and academic institutions, that are developing image recognition and biometric technology. Government officials instructed the groups to demonstrate how the technology could be used to identify people by their tattoos and match tattoos with similar imagery. Our investigation found that NIST was targeting people who shared common beliefs, with a heavy emphasis on religious imagery.  NIST researchers, we discovered, had also bypassed basic oversight measures. Despite rigid requirements designed to protect prisoners who might be used as subjects in government research, the researchers failed to seek sign-off from the in-house watchdog before embarking on the project…”

Categories: Law and Legal

Study suggests buried Internet infrastructure at risk as sea levels rise

University of Wisconsin – Madison: “Thousands of miles of buried fiber optic cable in densely populated coastal regions of the United States may soon be inundated by rising seas, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Oregon. The study, presented here today (July 16, 2018) at a meeting of internet network researchers, portrays critical communications infrastructure that could be submerged by rising seas in as soon as 15 years, according to the study’s senior author, Paul Barford, a UW-Madison professor of computer science. “Most of the damage that’s going to be done in the next 100 years will be done sooner than later,” says Barford, an authority on the “physical internet” — the buried fiber optic cables, data centers, traffic exchanges and termination points that are the nerve centers, arteries and hubs of the vast global information network. “That surprised us. The expectation was that we’d have 50 years to plan for it. We don’t have 50 years.” The study, conducted with Barford’s former student Ramakrishnan Durairajan, now of the University of Oregon, and Carol Barford, who directs UW-Madison’s Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment, is the first assessment of risk of climate change to the internet. It suggests that by the year 2033 more than 4,000 miles of buried fiber optic conduit will be underwater and more than 1,100 traffic hubs will be surrounded by water. The most susceptible U.S. cities, according to the report, are New York, Miami and Seattle, but the effects would not be confined to those areas and would ripple across the internet, says Barford, potentially disrupting global communications…”

Categories: Law and Legal

Why Sinclair's Bid to Buy the Tribune Company Might Die

Wired Top Stories - Mon, 07/16/2018 - 19:26
FCC Chair Ajit Pai, long seen as supporting the deal, suggests sending it to a judge–often a graveyard for merger proposals.
Categories: Just News

Strikes, Boycotts, and Outages Mar Amazon Prime Day

Wired Top Stories - Mon, 07/16/2018 - 19:00
Workers in Europe, upset by talk of cuts in pay and benefits, plan walkouts during one of the retailer's biggest promotions.
Categories: Just News

Bloomberg – Jeff Bezos is now the Richest Man in Modern History

Bloomberg News – “Jeff Bezos is the richest person in modern history. The Amazon.com Inc. founder’s net worth cracked $150 billion in New York on Monday, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. That’s about $55 billion more than Microsoft Corp. co-founder Bill Gates, the world’s second-richest person. Bezos, 54, also has topped Gates in inflation-adjusted terms. The $100 billion mark that Gates hit briefly in 1999 at the height of the dot-com boom would be worth about $149 billion in today’s dollars. That makes the Amazon chief executive officer richer than anyone else on earth since at least 1982, when Forbes published its inaugural wealth ranking…”

Categories: Law and Legal

NYT – Amazon’s Curious Case of the $2,630.52 Used Paperback

Many booksellers on Amazon strive to sell their wares as cheaply as possible. That, after all, is usually how you make a sale in a competitive marketplace. Other merchants favor a counterintuitive approach: Mark the price up to the moon. “Zowie,” the romance author Deborah Macgillivray wrote on Twitter last month after she discovered copies of her 2009 novel, “One Snowy Knight,” being offered for four figures. One was going for “$2,630.52 & FREE Shipping,” she noted. Since other copies of the paperback were being sold elsewhere on Amazon for as little as 99 cents, she was perplexed. “How many really sell at that price? Are they just hoping to snooker some poor soul?” Ms. Macgillivray wrote in an email. She noted that her blog had gotten an explosion in traffic from Russia. “Maybe Russian hackers do this in their spare time, making money on the side,” she said.

Zowie. Amazon is selling copies of my One Snowy Knight for $1,558.59 + $5.49 shipping + $0.00 estimated tax or $2,630.52 & FREE Shipping + $0.00 estimated tax Hang in there, it’s being reprinted in July for MUCH less…lol pic.twitter.com/eEqWUzg7kf

— Deborah Macgillivray (@Scotladywriter) June 5, 2018

Amazon is by far the largest marketplace for both new and used books the world has ever seen, and is also one of the most inscrutable. The retailer directly sells some books, while others are sold by third parties. The wild pricing happens with the latter. Books were Amazon’s first product. They made the company’s reputation and powered Jeff Bezos’ ascent to his perch as the world’s richest person. Amazon sold books so cheaply that land-based shops could not compete. It controls about half the market for new books, more than any bookseller in the history of the United States…”

“Amazon is driving us insane with its willingness to allow third-party vendors to sell authors’ books with zero oversight,” said Vida Engstrand, director of communications for Kensington, which published “One Snowy Knight.” “It’s maddening and just plain wrong.”

Categories: Law and Legal

HHS takes down Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Website

This site has been archived and remains available via the Internet Archive – https://web.archive.org/web/20180713143753/https://guideline.gov/

The AHRQ National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC, guideline.gov) Web site will not be available after July 16, 2018 because federal funding through AHRQ will no longer be available to support the NGC as of that date. AHRQ is receiving expressions of interest from stakeholders interested in carrying on NGC’s work. It is not clear at this time, however, when or if NGC (or something like NGC) will be online again. In addition, AHRQ has not yet determined whether, or to what extent, the Agency would have an ongoing role if a stakeholder were to continue to operate the NGC. We will continue to post summaries of new and updated evidence-based clinical practice guidelines until July 2, 2018. For any questions, please contact Mary.Nix@ahrq.hhs.gov

Categories: Law and Legal

Asian-Americans Facing Staggering Levels Of Income Inequality In The U.S.

Asian-Americans have displaced African-Americans as the most economically divided group in the U.S., according to the Pew Research Center. Food pantries are seeing growing needs among Asian-Americans.

Categories: Just News

Rubio, Warner Stress Election Security After Trump-Putin Summit

Wired Top Stories - Mon, 07/16/2018 - 18:13
Senators Mark Warner and Marco Rubio both cast President Trump's appearance in Helsinki as a major setback in the fight against Russian interference in elections around the world.
Categories: Just News

The Best Amazon Prime Day Deals for Home, Outdoor, and Lifestyle: Instant Pot, Zojirushi, Fitbit

Wired Top Stories - Mon, 07/16/2018 - 18:00
Pull your shattered life back together with our favorite home and outdoor deals this Prime Day.
Categories: Just News

Facebook AI dataset creates virtual tours of NYC neighborhoods

“Facebook’s Artificial Intelligence Research (FAIR) group has published a dataset to support a project called Talk the Walk, which aims to train AI systems to serve as virtual tour guides. The dataset includes maps of New York City neighborhoods, 360-degree photos of the neighborhoods, and sample text of humans guiding other humans through them. The goal of Talk the Walk is to advance research into localization, goal-oriented dialogue, visual perception, and other challenges in developing AI agents that can interact seamlessly with humans.”

Categories: Law and Legal

U.S. Intelligence Chiefs, Current And Former, Fire Back At Trump

Trump repeatedly offered support to Russian leader Vladimir Putin and refused to endorse the U.S. intelligence community's finding that Russia interfered in the 2016 election to help Trump.

(Image credit: Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP)

Categories: Just News

Ecuador Builds Pyramid Of Roses In Attempt To Set A World Record

Half a million flowers went into the structure, which is a replica of a pre-Incan pyramid.

(Image credit: Rodrigo Buendia/AFP/Getty Images)

Categories: Just News

'Disgraceful,' 'Pushover,' 'Deeply Troubled': Reaction To The Trump-Putin Summit

Top Republicans voiced faith in U.S. intelligence, while some criticized Trump directly following his press conference. Top Democrats questioned whether Russia has damaging information on Trump.

(Image credit: Patrick Semansky/AP)

Categories: Just News

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