Law and Legal

Mapping COVID-19 Vaccine Pre-Purchases Across the Globe

Launch and Scale Speedometer: “A flurry of nearly 200 COVID-19 vaccine candidates are moving forward through the development and clinical trials processes at unprecedented speed; more than ten candidates are already in Phase 3 large-scale trials and several have received emergency or limited authorization. Also unprecedented is the number of advance market commitments (AMCs) made by countries and multilateral partnerships eager to reserve vaccine supply, even before any candidates are on the market. Our team has aggregated and analyzed publicly available data on vaccine procurement and manufacturing to track the flow of procurement and better understand global equity challenges. We developed a data framework of relevant variables and conducted desk research of publicly available information to identify COVID vaccine candidates and status, deals and ongoing negotiations for procurement and manufacturing, COVID burden by country, and allocation and distribution plans. We have also conducted interviews with public officials in key countries to better understand the context and challenges facing vaccine allocation and distribution…”

See our Interactive COVID-19 vaccine procurement data

Categories: Law and Legal

Why You Can’t Copy a Recipe Book

Plagarism Today – “U.S. Copyright Law is extremely clear, copyright “Does not protect recipes that are mere listings of ingredients.” As such, your grandmother’s secret recipe for pumpkin pie joins the ranks of high fashion and phone books as things that can not be copyrighted. However, if you open up just about any cookbook that you can buy, you’ll notice copyright notices prominently displayed in all of the usual places. The reason isn’t because recipe books are lying to you, it’s because, while recipes can’t be copyright protected, other parts of the books can. So, as we celebrate the holidays in the United States, we’re going to take a look at cookbooks and why, even though recipes can’t be copyrighted, you can’t just photocopy and share a cookbook legally. We will also take a look at what cooks and bakers can do to better protect their creations, even if the recipes they develop don’t enjoy copyright protection…”

Categories: Law and Legal

End of Term Presidential Harvest 2020

“The Library of Congress, Internet Archive, University of North Texas Libraries, George Washington University Libraries, Stanford University Libraries, EDGI, and the U.S. Government Publishing Office have joined together for a collaborative project to preserve public United States Government web sites at the end of the current presidential administration ending January 20, 2021. This harvest is intended to document federal agencies’ presence on the World Wide Web during the transition of Presidential administrations and to enhance the existing collections of the partner institutions. In this collaboration, the partners will structure and execute a comprehensive harvest of the Federal Government .gov domain. The Internet Archive will crawl broadly across the entire .gov domain. The University of North Texas and others will supplement and extend the broad comprehensive crawl with focused, in-depth crawls based on prioritized lists of URLs, including social media. This dual-edged approach seeks to capture a comprehensive snapshot of the Federal government on the Web at the close of the current administration. Harvested content from previous End of Term Presidential Harvests is available at http://eotarchive.cdlib.org/…”

Categories: Law and Legal

Mapping U.S. Covid-19 Cases Near You

Bloomberg: “Few areas of the U.S. have been spared a recent surge in the Covid-19 outbreak, as daily new case counts routinely exceed 100,000 across the U.S. and the number of hospitalizations nears totals not seen since the early days of the pandemic. State-level reporting of cases and deaths brush over how rapidly the virus spread through communities, with staggering numbers in some locales as people spread the virus across state lines, often unknowingly, as they socialized, worked or commuted. Examining the country through the more localized communities Americans interact with on a daily basis—roughly defined here as a 2-hour drive from each county seat—it becomes clear where spikes in new cases are steepest and where the death toll is currently rising…”

Categories: Law and Legal

The Washington Post asked readers to describe 2020 in one word or phrase

Here’s what they said. “A global pandemic. A racial reckoning. A presidential impeachment. A monumental election. We all know 2020 was a year like no other. But is it possible to sum it up in one word or phrase? The Washington Post asked readers to do just that and offer their reasoning, hoping that all together we might discover some collective wisdom. To look forward, we also asked them what they were hopeful for going into 2021. Over 2,000 responded. One New Jersey high school history teacher even assigned more than 100 students to share their take. We’ve highlighted the words and phrases that were most revealing of our range of experiences and grouped them by theme. For some popular words, we included takes from multiple people, which you can see by clicking on the arrows. Many of the words submitted reflect just how horrible this year has been. “Dumpster fire” was the sixth most common word or phrase, while “nightmare” was No. 11. But others were also popular, such as “surreal” (No. 5) and variations of the word “relentless” (No. 10). A few you might expect to see, such as “quarantine” and “doomscrolling,” had to be left on the cutting-room floor, along with words we couldn’t print in a family newspaper. Although many of us were physically more alone this year, the responses showed how much we shared in common…”

Categories: Law and Legal

2020 An extraordinary year in photos

Washington Post – “As professional photography editors, we are accustomed to seeing a little bit of everything: war, famine, fires, hurricanes, politics, suffering, beauty, silliness and sometimes joy. This year was different. Photography, and photojournalism in particular, is regarded as a medium of reality. Reality became surreal this year and with it, photojournalism. Photography shines brightest when we are moved by it or it reveals something to us that we may have never seen before. We believe this selection of extraordinary photographs from the past year radiates that light. — the Washington Post Photography Team.”

Categories: Law and Legal

Operation Warp Speed Contracts for COVID-19 Vaccines and Ancillary Vaccination Materials

CRS Insight – Operation Warp Speed Contracts for COVID-19 Vaccines and Ancillary Vaccination Materials, December 22, 2020: “Operation Warp Speed (OWS) is an interagency partnership between the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Defense (DOD) that coordinates federal efforts to accelerate the development, acquisition, and distribution of COVID-19 medical countermeasures. Collaborating HHS components include the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA). Although the stated goals of OWS include therapeutics and diagnostics, most of the money awarded to date has focused on vaccines. This Insight summarizes OWS’s vaccine-related contracts, including those for ancillary vaccination materials (e.g., needles and vials)…BARDA is currently supporting seven vaccine candidates through funding research and development, funding increases in manufacturing capacity, and/or advance purchase contracts. Of these candidates, only six are also being supported by OWS (Merck/IAVI is supported by BARDA, but not OWS)…The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine received Emergency Use Authorization(EUA) from theFDA on December 11, 2020, and the Moderna vaccine received similar approval status on December 18, 2020. Distribution of these two vaccines has thus begun according to guidelines approved by the CDC. Because OWS has purchased these vaccines, all doses are to be federally owned and provided at no cost to the American public…”

Categories: Law and Legal

Tracking the coronavirus vaccine, state by state

“…The charts below reflect each state’s priority groups as described so far by the states. Some have specified only the very first recipients while others have given longer priority lists. The estimated population in each group removes overlap, such as medical workers with pre-existing conditions, as estimated by Ariadne Labs and Surgo Ventures based on state priority lists collected by The Post. The Post is collecting how many vaccines have been administered in states that are reporting it…” Use the search feature to identify the state you live in. An example is DC – and the information provided is: “District of Columbia is expected to get about 18,000 doses in the first set of Pfizer vaccines, and a total of 35,000 of the Pfizer and Moderna doses before the end of the year. That is enough to vaccinate 4.9 percent of the state population. The state has approximately 59,000 health-care workers and 4,900 nursing home residents and workers, and the number of doses expected in December is enough to give 54 percent of them a single dose by the end of the year. The vaccine requires a follow-up booster about three or four weeks after the first shot. The District of Columbia has rolled out its vaccine distribution in three phases. First in line are hospital staff, front-line health-care personnel, emergency services providers, and long-term and home health-care workers, including those who work in nursing homes and ancillary care facilities. After that, the District’s health department plans to vaccinate those 65 years or older, and residents of nursing homes, transitional housing, homeless shelters and correctional facilities. Essential workers including grocery store employees, child-care providers, teachers, and law enforcement will also be prioritized in the initial phase…”

Categories: Law and Legal

Our favorite cookbooks of 2020

Washington Post: “Like all of you, we’ve been at home for most of 2020, cooking more meals in our own kitchens than we ever expected to. Many of us have turned to familiar ingredients and recipes time and time again, when we just needed to get dinner on the table or couldn’t run out to the store. Thankfully, we’ve also had cookbooks to help us get out of the rut. They introduced us to new dishes, new people and new ways to “go somewhere” without actually leaving our homes. Great cookbooks do a lot of things. They inspire us. They make us think. In 2020, our favorite books were tasty and timely, providing us with satisfying meals and food for thought about underrepresented voices and cuisines, how to make do with what you have, and more. We think you’ll find these 12 cookbooks, each selected by a staffer, just as inspiring this year — and beyond…” [And 12 holiday cookie recipes to end the year on a sweeter note.]

Categories: Law and Legal

The Plague Year – The mistakes and the struggles behind America’s coronavirus tragedy

Categories: Law and Legal

The CDC’s failed race against covid-19: A threat underestimated and a test overcomplicated

Washington Post: “A new virus was exploding in Wuhan, a Chinese city with 11 million people connected by its airport to destinations around the world. In the United States, doctors and hospitals were waiting for the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to develop a test to detect the threat. On Jan. 13, the World Health Organization had made public a recipe for how to configure such a test, and several countries wasted no time getting started: Within hours, scientists in Thailand used the instructions to deploy a new test. The CDC would not roll out one that worked for 46 more days. Inside the 15-acre campus of the CDC in northeast Atlanta, the senior scientists developing the coronavirus test were fighting and losing the battle against time. The agency squandered weeks as it pursued a test design far more complicated than the WHO version and as its scientists wrestled with failures that regulators would later trace to a contaminated lab. The Washington Post reviewed internal documents and interviewed more than 30 government scientists and others with knowledge of the events to understand more fully the missteps in those early weeks as the coronavirus began to spread unchecked across the nation. Most spoke anonymously because they were not authorized to do so publicly. This account reveals new details about how an overly ambitious test design and laboratory contamination caused the CDC’s delay, and describes previously unreported challenges that confronted the agency scientists assigned to carry out the work…”

Categories: Law and Legal

3 lessons from Stanford’s Covid-19 vaccine algorithm debacle

STAT: “Stanford found itself in hot water last week after deploying a faulty Covid-19 vaccine distribution algorithm. But the fiasco offers a cautionary tale that extends far beyond Stanford’s own doors — and holds crucial lessons as the country prepares to confront complex decisions about who gets the vaccine, when, and why. At the center of the debacle was a rules-based formula designed to determine the order in which the thousands of medical workers at Stanford should be vaccinated. The tool took into account employee-based variables like age, job-based variables, and public health guidance, according to MIT Technology Review. But flaws in that calculation meant hospital administrators and other employees working from home were toward the front of the line, while only seven of Stanford’s 1,300 medical residents made the list. Experts told STAT what went wrong appears to be a story of unintended consequences, which often arise at the intersection of human intuition and artificial intelligence. Here are a few key points to consider about the incident and the broader issues it reflects…” [h/t Pete Weiss]

Categories: Law and Legal

Pages

Subscribe to www.dgbutterworth.com aggregator - Law and Legal