Law and Legal

What jobs are affected by AI?

Brookings – “…White-collar jobs (better-paid professionals with bachelor’s degrees) along with production workers may be most susceptible to AI’s spread into the economy. AI could affect work in virtually every occupational group. However, whereas research on automation’s robotics and software continues to show that less-educated, lower-wage workers may be most exposed to displacement, the present analysis suggests that better-educated, better-paid workers (along with manufacturing and production workers) will be the most affected by the new AI technologies, with some exceptions. Our analysis shows that workers with graduate or professional degrees will be almost four times as exposed to AI as workers with just a high school degree. Holders of bachelor’s degrees will be the most exposed by education level, more than five times as exposed to AI than workers with just a high school degree…”

Categories: Law and Legal

Google update on political ads policy

Google Blog: “…While we’ve never offered granular microtargeting of election ads, we believe there’s more we can do to further promote increased visibility of election ads. That’s why we’re limiting election ads audience targeting to the following general categories: age, gender, and general location (postal code level). Political advertisers can, of course, continue to do contextual targeting, such as serving ads to people reading or watching a story about, say, the economy. This will align our approach to election ads with long-established practices in media such as TV, radio, and print, and result in election ads being more widely seen and available for public discussion. (Of course, some media, like direct mail, continues to be targeted more granularly.) It will take some time to implement these changes, and we will begin enforcing the new approach in the U.K. within a week (ahead of the General Election), in the EU by the end of the year, and in the rest of the world starting on January 6, 2020…” [Slow roll – does anyone even remember Google’s code of conduct – “Don’t be evil“?!? And please just make a choice – and use DuckDuckGo.]

Categories: Law and Legal

The most remote emergency room: Life and death in rural America

Washington Post: “…As hospitals and physicians continue to disappear from rural America at record rates, here is the latest attempt to fill a widening void: a telemedicine center that provides remote emergency care for 179 hospitals across 30 states. Physicians for Avera eCare work out of high-tech cubicles instead of exam rooms. They wear scrubs to look the part of traditional doctors on camera, even though they never directly see or touch their patients. They respond to more than 15,000 emergencies each year by using remote-controlled cameras and computer screens at what has become rural America’s busiest emergency room, which is in fact a virtual ER located in a suburban industrial park…”

Categories: Law and Legal

Google introduces Your News Assistant

Google Blog: “…Today, we’re introducing Your News Update, a smarter way to listen to the news hosted by the Google Assistant. You can try it today by updating your Assistant news settings. When you say, “Hey Google, play me the news” on any Assistant-enabled phone or smart speaker, Your News Update will begin with a mix of short news stories chosen in that moment based on your interests, location, user history and preferences, as well as the top news stories out there…”

Categories: Law and Legal

Alexa, Are You Spying On Me?

How To Prevent Your Smart Devices From Listening To You – “Lorrie Cranor, who is director of Carnegie Mellon University’s CyLab Usable Privacy and Security Laboratory, says…“A lot people feel invaded,”…“They say I understand that this device, this thermostat or whatever is listening to me, but it’s a machine. I don’t care, but if they know that a person is listening, that takes it to a different level.” She says smart speaker makers explain why they have people listen: “One of the reasons that they record it is to improve their systems. And part of how they do it is they have a human listen and basically grade the computer.” And in rare cases, smart speaker recordings have actually wound up in court. “There have been murder cases and other types of court cases, where those recordings have been subpoenaed,” said Cranor. “So they could come back to haunt you or to save you, depending on which side you’re on!”…

Categories: Law and Legal

A Field Guide to Polling: Election 2020 Edition

Pew Research Center -“While survey research in the United States is a year-round undertaking, the public’s focus on polling is never more intense than during the run-up to a presidential election. This essay is our attempt as survey methodologists and social science researchers to assess the state of the craft in 2019. “Can I trust the polls?” is among the most common questions we get at Pew Research Center. And, maybe more to the point, “Which polls can I trust?” There’s a reasonably straightforward answer to the first question. Rigorously conducted surveys are still trustworthy, as long as you apply a dose of discrimination and are realistic about what polls can and can’t do. But the answer to the second question – how to sort the “good” polls from the “bad” – is considerably trickier in this age of polling industry change and innovation. Before we dive into how best to attempt that sorting, let’s take a broader look at the issue of trust in polls…” [h/t Pete Weiss]

Categories: Law and Legal

Green streets: which city has the most trees?

The Guardian UK – “Urban trees offer huge benefits for climate regulation and personal wellbeing – and cities from Tampa to Frankfurt are intent on boosting their numbers. The Florida city of Tampa claims a number of firsts: the world’s largest pirate festival; America’s longest continuous sidewalk (at 4.5 miles); and Babe Ruth’s longest ever home run (587 feet). And now the city has another accolade to its name – it’s a world leader for trees. According to calculations by the Senseable City Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), more than one third (36.1%) of the city is given over to tree cover. The arboreal city tops MIT’s Treepedia list, which measures canopy cover in cities, closely followed by Singapore (29.3%), Oslo (28.8%), and Sydney and Vancouver (both 25.9%). MIT’s home city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, meanwhile, scores 25.3%…”

Categories: Law and Legal

Top 10 Emerging Technologies of 2019

“One day soon an emerging technology highlighted in this report will allow you to virtually teleport to a distant site and actually feel the handshakes and hugs of fellow cyber travelers. Also close to becoming commonplace: humanoid (and animaloid) robots designed to socialize with people; a system for pinpointing the source of a food-poisoning outbreak in just seconds; minuscule lenses that will pave the way for diminutive cameras and other devices; strong, biodegradable plastics that can be fashioned from otherwise useless plant wastes; DNA-based data-storage systems that will reliably stow ginormous amounts of information; and more. Together with the World Economic Forum, Scientific American convened an international Steering Group of leading technology experts and engaged in an intense process to identify this year’s “Top 10 Emerging Technologies.” After soliciting nominations from additional experts around the globe, the Steering Group evaluated dozens of proposals according to a number of criteria: Do the suggested technologies have the potential to provide major benefits to societies and economies? Could they alter established ways of doing things? Are they still in early stages of development but attracting a lot of interest from research labs, companies or investors? Are they likely to make significant inroads in the next several years? The group sought more information where needed and honed the list in four virtual meetings…”

Categories: Law and Legal

A Last Dance for Leonard Cohen

The New York Times –  The musician and poet released “You Want It Darker” 19 days before his death in 2016. His son, Adam, finished more songs from those sessions for a posthumous album. “The last time Leonard Cohen appeared in public was in mid-October 2016 at a Los Angeles news conference for his 14th studio album, “You Want It Darker,” just a few weeks before his death. Behind him hung a Canadian flag and beside him sat his son, Adam, a musician who had served as producer on the stirring LP. At one point Cohen, stooped and frail but sharp as ever in an impeccably tailored black suit, treated the audience to a recitation from a piece still in progress. He drew a breath, and then in that inimitable baritone, he began:

Listen to the hummingbird
Whose wings you cannot see
Listen to the hummingbird
Don’t listen to me

The audience applauded, and Cohen — who retreated at the height of his fame to live for five years in a Buddhist monastery — demurred with a characteristically self-abnegating joke: “I would say the hummingbird deserves the royalties on that one.” The interviewer asked if the song would appear on his next album. Said the ailing, 82-year-old Cohen, “G-d willing.” It seems to have been his will. “Listen to the Hummingbird” is the final track on Cohen’s posthumous new album, “Thanks for the Dance,” which will be released on Friday. The raw audio of that passage from the news conference was tracked down by Adam Cohen and the engineer Michael Chaves, who mixed out the buzzing tone of the room’s halogen lights and composed around it a gentle, unobtrusive piano melody. Adam had already done the same for many of the other vocal takes and half-finished songs his father left behind… [this article includes a link to Leonard Cohen – Happens to the Heart (Official Video)]

Categories: Law and Legal

Women in Congress, 1917-2019

CRS Report – Women in Congress, 1917-2019: Service Dates and Committee Assignments by Member, and Lists by State and Congress Updated November 13, 2019 – “In total 365 women have been elected or appointed to Congress, 247 Democrats and 118 Republicans. These figures include six nonvoting Delegates, one each from Guam, Hawaii, the District of Columbia, and American Samoa, and two from the U.S. Virgin Islands, as well as one Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico. Of these 365 women, there have been 309 (211 Democrats, 98 Republicans) women elected only to the House of Representatives; 40 (25 Democrats, 15 Republicans) women elected or appointed only to the Senate; and 16 (11 Democrats, 5 Republicans) women who have served in both houses. A record 131 women were initially sworn in for the 116th Congress. One has since resigned. Of 130 women currently in Congress, there are 25 in the Senate (17 Democrats and 8 Republicans); 101 Representatives in the House (88 Democrats and 13 Republicans); and 4 women in the House (2 Democrats and 2 Republicans) who serve as Delegates or Resident Commissioner, representing the District of Columbia, American Samoa, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico. This report includes brief biographical information, committee assignments, dates of service, district information, and listings by Congress and state, and (for Representatives) congressional districts of the 365 women who have been elected or appointed to Congress. It will be updated when there are relevant changes in the makeup of Congress. For additional information, including a discussion of the impact of women in Congress as well as historical information, including the number and percentage of women in Congress over time, data on entry to Congress, comparisons to international and state legislatures, tenure, firsts for women in Congress, women in leadership, and African American, Asian Pacific American, and Hispanic women in Congress, see CRS Report R43244, Women in Congress: Statistics and Brief Overview, by Jennifer E. Manning and Ida A. Brudnick.”

Categories: Law and Legal

Congressional Participation in Litigation: Article III and Legislative Standing

CRS Report – Congressional Participation in Litigation: Article III and Legislative Standing Updated November 8, 2019 – Since the founding, the federal courts have played a critical role in adjudicating legal disputes, including ones involving executive action. As the Supreme Court stated in Marbury v. Madison, “where a specific duty is assigned by law . . . the individual who considers himself injured has a right to resort to the laws of his country for a remedy.” To that end, Congress and its Members have occasionally sued the Executive in federal court in an attempt to vindicate their institutional priorities, argue that the Executive is violating their legislative prerogatives, or advance their legislative policy interests. During the Obama Administration, for instance, legislative entities brought or joined litigation in federal court for a host of reasons, such as to challenge the Executive’s decision to allegedly expend money without a congressional appropriation, to defend the Defense of Marriage Act from constitutional challenge after the Executive declined to do so, and to challenge the Executive’s decision to engage in military action in Libya. Likewise, during the Trump Administration, legislators have become involved in lawsuits challenging the President’s alleged unconstitutional acceptance of emoluments, suits demanding the production of documents from the Administration, and a lawsuit seeking to enjoin the executive branch from spending certain funds to build certain barriers along the Mexican border. Congressional interest in litigation likely has increased in salience under the current divided government, as illustrated by the House of Representatives’ resolution to authorize the House to participate in ongoing litigation in Texas involving the Affordable Care Act and a lawsuit brought by several Members of Congress challenging the President’s appointment of an acting Attorney General. However, whenever any party seeks to invoke the power of the federal courts, it must first show that its dispute belongs there. For nearly its entire history, the Supreme Court has emphasized that the role of courts is in “decid[ing] on the rights of individuals.” By contrast, “[v]indicating the public interest (including the public interest in Government observance of the Constitution and laws) is the function of Congress and the Chief Executive.” The federal courts apply a number of doctrines, known as justiciability doctrines, to ensure that judges do not step beyond their bounds and decide issues more properly reserved for the other branches. Foremost among these doctrines is the requirement that a party seeking judicial relief from a federal court demonstrate “standing.” This report provides an overview of the standing doctrine as it applies to lawsuits.”

Categories: Law and Legal

Pete Recommends Weekly highlights on cyber security issues November 15, 2019

Via LLRXPete Recommends Weekly highlights on cyber security issues November 15, 2019 – Privacy and security issues impact every aspect of our lives – home, work, travel, education, health and medical records – to name but a few. On a weekly basis Pete Weiss highlights articles and information that focus on the increasingly complex and wide ranging ways technology is used to compromise and diminish our privacy and security, often without our situational awareness. Four highlights from this week: Google is collecting health data on millions of Americans; How to Protect Yourself From Unethical or Illegal Spying; Everything you need to know about Google Reverse Image Search; and Federal Court Rules Suspicionless Searches of Travelers’ Phones and Laptops Unconstitutional.

Categories: Law and Legal

Discover new places with help from top Local Guides

Google Blog: “…One of the things we shared at Connect Live this week was that we’ll soon be piloting a new feature in Google Maps that will help people discover new places with help from top Local Guides. People in Bangkok, Delhi, London, Mexico City, New York, Osaka, San Francisco, São Paulo and Tokyo will soon see top Local Guides featured in the For You tab of the Google Maps app. When you follow one of these Local Guides, their recommendations will be surfaced to you in Google Maps, so you can get inspired with ideas of things to do and places to go. If you live in one of the nine test cities, keep an eye on the For You tab of Google Maps, you just might discover something new with help from a local…”

Categories: Law and Legal

Open Letter to Law School Deans about Privacy Law Education in Law Schools

Daniel Solove – Founder of TeachPrivacy: “Recently a group of legal academics and practitioners in the field of privacy law sent a letter to the deans of all U.S. law schools about privacy law education in law schools.  My own brief intro about this endeavor is here in italics, followed by the letter. The signatories to the letter have signed onto the letter, not this italicized intro. Although the field of privacy law grown dramatically in past two decades, education in law schools about privacy law has significantly lagged behind.  Most U.S. law schools lack a course on privacy law. Of those that have courses, many are small seminars, often taught by adjuncts.  Of the law schools that do have a privacy course, most often just have one course. Most schools lack a full-time faculty member who focuses substantially on privacy law.  This state of affairs is a great detriment to students. I am constantly approached by students and graduates from law schools across the country who are wondering how they can learn about privacy law and enter the field. Many express great disappointment at the lack of any courses, faculty, or activities at their schools. After years of hoping that the legal academy would wake up and respond, I came to the realization that this wasn’t going to happen on its own. The following letter [click here for the PDF version] aims to make deans aware of the privacy law field. I hope that the letter is met with action. If you are a law student who wants more privacy law opportunities, circulate this letter at your school and speak up. If you’re a faculty member who believes that your school should be doing more in this area, please recommend expanding faculty and curriculum in the field. Consider teaching a privacy law course yourself. If you’re a dean, a visionary thing that you can do is to direct attention and focus to this area: appoint faculty, expand curriculum, and help develop other activities and opportunities in this area.  The letter explains in greater detail the things than can be done.  If you act on these suggestions, it will be a tremendous benefit to your students…”

Categories: Law and Legal

The Best Books to Gift People You Know Well—and People You Don’t

Gift Guide via Fortune: “It’s not quite make-or-break time for holiday shopping, but the clock is already ticking. There are few categories that seem to have something for everyone and are easy to drop in the mail. One of those categories would be books. Now certainly, it’s an overwhelming one. Where to start? If you know your gift receivers well, then you could likely narrow it down to at least a favorite genre and maybe even cross out books you know they’ve read. But books are also a great option for people you don’t know well, especially those touching on food, wine, art, pop culture, entertainment—you get the idea. Here’s a list of new releases this year that could delight readers on your gift list this season…”

Categories: Law and Legal

Building a Dataset of Gun Violence in the United States

Center for Data Innovation: “Journalists from The Trace, a nonprofit news organization, and BuzzFeed have released a dataset of violent crimes from 56 U.S. law enforcement entities. The dataset includes both original data from government agencies and standardized data that the researchers modified to use common fields and classifications. The dataset includes information on more than 3,000 shootings that have occurred in Boston, which researchers can filter by factors such as location, age, and race. The data can help researchers and policymakers address gun violence issues in the United States.”

Categories: Law and Legal

How Not to Plot Secret Foreign Policy: On a Cellphone and WhatsApp

The New York Times – “Rudolph W. Giuliani, the former New York mayor at the center of the impeachment investigation into the conduct of Ukraine policy, makes a living selling cybersecurity advice through his companies. President Trump even named him the administration’s first informal “cybersecurity adviser.” But inside the National Security Council, officials expressed wonderment that Mr. Giuliani was running his “irregular channel” of Ukraine diplomacy over open cell lines and communications apps in Ukraine that the Russians have deeply penetrated. In his testimony to the House impeachment inquiry, Tim Morrison, who is leaving as the National Security Council’s head of Europe and Russia, recalled expressing astonishment to William B. Taylor Jr., who was sitting in as the chief American diplomat in Ukraine, that the leaders of the “irregular channel” seemed to have little concern about revealing their conversations to Moscow. “He and I discussed a lack of, shall we say, OPSEC, that much of Rudy’s discussions were happening over an unclassified cellphone or, perhaps as bad, WhatsApp messages, and therefore you can only imagine who else knew about them,” Mr. Morrison testified. OPSEC is the government’s shorthand for operational security…”

Categories: Law and Legal

The 50 Best Nonfiction Books of the Past 25 Years

Slate’s books team selects the definitive works of reporting, memoir, and argument of the past quarter-century. “…Slate’s list of the definitive nonfiction books written in English in the past quarter-century includes beautifully written memoirs but also books of reportage, collections of essays, travelogues, works of cultural criticism, passionate arguments, even a compendium of household tips. What they all share is a commitment to “mostly truth” and the belief that digging deep to find a real story—whether it’s located in your memory, on dusty archive shelves, in Russian literature, in a slum in Mumbai—is a task worth undertaking…”

Categories: Law and Legal

Who Stole My Face? The Risks Of Law Enforcement Use Of Facial Recognition Software

Via LLRX – Who Stole My Face? The Risks Of Law Enforcement Use Of Facial Recognition Software – Lawyer and Legal Technology Evangelist Nicole L. Black discusses the “reckless social experiment” that facial surveillance represents across all aspects of life in America. It is the norm on social media, in air travel, as a mechanism for state, local and federal government to identify location and means of travel (car, train, bus), in banking and financial transactions (smile next time you use your ATM), and as a security feature to unlock your phone, to name but some of its applications. You cannot opt-out of the use of your data nor the multifaceted ways that it impacts your diminishing privacy and civil liberties.

Categories: Law and Legal

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