Blog Rolls

Dimensions.Guide

Dimensions.Guide is a comprehensive reference database of dimensioned drawings documenting the standard measurements and sizes of the everyday objects and spaces that make up our built environment. Created as a universal resource to better communicate the basic properties, systems, and logics of our world, Dimensions.Guide is a free platform for increasing public and professional knowledge of life and design. Updated daily. [Take a look – you will be amazed – and return again and again – my favorite of the moment – and it changes daily, is the dimensions of the giant turtle.]

Categories: Law and Legal

Macron Promises Minimum Wage Hike And Tax Cuts To End 'Yellow Vest' Protests

In a speech on Monday, France's president declared "a state of social and economic emergency," offering some concessions to his critics. Among them, tax relief for the middle class and pensioners.

(Image credit: Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images)

Categories: Just News

5 Questions Congress Should Ask Google's Sundar Pichai

Wired Top Stories - Mon, 12/10/2018 - 18:58
Google's CEO will testify before the House Judiciary Committee in a hearing focused on transparency and search practices.
Categories: Just News

50th anniversary of Demo on Personal and Collaborative Computing

“This year marks the 50th anniversary of Doug Engelbart’s groundbreaking 1968 Demo – also known as “The Mother of All Demos.” It was there at the 1968 Fall Joint Computer Conference that Doug and his team at SRI first presented their seminal work in personal and collaborative computing to the world – this was the debut of the mouse, windows, hypermedia, file sharing, teleconferencing, and much, much more. Use #theDemoat50 on Social Media Planning is in the works for some exciting ways to celebrate, including events this December in Silicon Valley, Tokyo,  and more. See our Events page for details, and Activities for fun things to do and see online…”

Categories: Law and Legal

Earth's Depths Are Teeming With Otherworldly Microbes

Wired Top Stories - Mon, 12/10/2018 - 18:46
Scientists have discovered a vast subterranean ecosystem of microbial life deep underground, stretching our sense of life's limits.
Categories: Just News

Every moment of every day mobile phone apps collect detailed location data

The New York Times – “The millions of dots on the map trace highways, side streets and bike trails — each one following the path of an anonymous cellphone user. One path tracks someone from a home outside Newark to a nearby Planned Parenthood, remaining there for more than an hour. Another represents a person who travels with the mayor of New York during the day and returns to Long Island at night. Yet another leaves a house in upstate New York at 7 a.m. and travels to a middle school 14 miles away, staying until late afternoon each school day. Only one person makes that trip: Lisa Magrin, a 46-year-old math teacher. Her smartphone goes with her. An app on the device gathered her location information, which was then sold without her knowledge. It recorded her whereabouts as often as every two seconds, according to a database of more than a million phones in the New York area that was reviewed by The New York Times. While Ms. Magrin’s identity was not disclosed in those records, The Times was able to easily connect her to that dot. The app tracked her as she went to a Weight Watchers meeting and to her dermatologist’s office for a minor procedure. It followed her hiking with her dog and staying at her ex-boyfriend’s home, information she found disturbing. “It’s the thought of people finding out those intimate details that you don’t want people to know,” said Ms. Magrin, who allowed The Times to review her location data. Like many consumers, Ms. Magrin knew that apps could track people’s movements. But as smartphones have become ubiquitous and technology more accurate, an industry of snooping on people’s daily habits has spread and grown more intrusive…”

  • See also Geolocation Privacy Legislation: “This page provides information on congressional bills that seek to clarify how personal location information may be used by law enforcement, companies, employers, and others. This page is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to influence, endorse, or express opinions on any ongoing legal deliberations. Several U.S. states and non-U.S. jurisdictions have enacted laws establishing personal location privacy rights. However, current U.S. statute at the federal level does not provide clear protection of geolocation information…” and The Privacy Policy Landscape After the GDPR
Categories: Law and Legal

Maria Butina, Accused Of Being Russian Agent, Reaches Plea Deal With Feds

The Russian woman apparently was part of an effort to build clandestine ties between Moscow and important parts of the conservative establishment.

(Image credit: Pavel Ptitsin/AP)

Categories: Just News

UK just banned the NHS from buying any more fax machines

BBC News: “The National Health Service will be banned from buying fax machines from next month – and has been told by the government to phase out the machines entirely by 31 March 2020. In July, the Royal College of Surgeons revealed nearly 9,000 fax machines were in use across the NHS in England. The Department of Health said a change to more modern communication methods was needed to improve patient safety and cyber security. An RCS spokesman said they supported the government’s decision. In place of fax machines, the Department of Health said secure email should be used. Richard Kerr, who is the chair of the RCS’s commission on the future of surgery, said the continued use of the outdated technology by the NHS was “absurd”. He added it was “crucial” that the health service invested in “better ways of communicating the vast amount of patient information that is going to be generated” in the future. The group’s report from earlier this year found the use of fax machines was most common at the Newcastle upon Tyne NHS Trust, which still relied on 603 machines. Three-quarters of the trusts in England replied to the survey – 95 in total. Ten trusts said that they did not own any fax machines, but four in ten reported more than 100 in use…”

Categories: Law and Legal

Report – What is the future of office spaces?

World Economic Forum: “A lot of us spend long stretches in the office, but outdated design could be damaging our wellbeing and mental health. What’s more, it’s killing our productivity. One study found that office workers spend more time sitting than pensioners, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes and even cancer. That’s why forward-looking designers are finding ways to build spaces that heal rather than hurt us. Going beyond the already ubiquitous standing desks and social “breakout sofas,” the office of the future is healthy, harmonious and happy. Here’s how it’s beginning to take shape…

…Workers’ productivity declines if they’re stationed more than 7.5 metres from a window, according to data sourced by the International Well Building Institute. Just like those outdoorsy office features mentioned above, exposure to natural light reduces anxiety and stress – and provide that crucial vit D boost so many of us sorely lack. Skylights and translucent panels are a good way to let the daylight in, but they aren’t practical, it’s important to augment the shortfall in sun rays using a host of nifty aids, such as tabletop UV lamps or natural-spectrum bulbs…”

Categories: Law and Legal

We Need an FDA For Algorithms

Nautilus – UK mathematician Hannah Fry on the promise and danger of an AI world.” In the introduction to her new book, Hannah Fry points out something interesting about the phrase “Hello World.” It’s never been quite clear, she says, whether the phrase—which is frequently the entire output of a student’s first computer program—is supposed to be attributed to the program, awakening for the first time, or to the programmer, announcing their triumphant first creation.

Perhaps for this reason, “Hello World” calls to mind a dialogue between human and machine, one which has never been more relevant than it is today. Her book, called Hello World, published in September, walks us through a rapidly computerizing world. Fry is both optimistic and excited—along with her Ph.D. students at the University of College, London, she has worked on many algorithms herself—and cautious. In conversation and in her book, she issues a call to arms: We need to make algorithms transparent, regulated, and forgiving of the flawed creatures that converse with them…”

Categories: Law and Legal

Lawsuits Say Australia Subjects Asylum Seekers To Torture And Crimes Against Humanity

The class actions represent more than 1,000 migrants detained by the government on islands belonging to other countries, under contract with Australia.

(Image credit: Aziz Abdul/AP)

Categories: Just News

House Cmte Investigation Issues Scathing Report on Equifax Breach

The Hill: “The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, following a 14-month probe, released a scathing report Monday saying the consumer credit reporting agency aggressively collected data on millions of consumers and businesses while failing to take key steps to secure such information. The breach is estimated to have harmed 148 million consumers.

“In 2005, former Equifax Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Richard Smith embarked on an aggressive growth strategy, leading to the acquisition of multiple companies, information technology (IT) systems, and data,” according to the 96-page report authored by Republicans. “Equifax, however, failed to implement an adequate security program to protect this sensitive data. As a result, Equifax allowed one of the largest data breaches in U.S. history. Such a breach was entirely preventable.”…

Categories: Law and Legal

Report – Persistent antisemitism hangs over EU

“Antisemitic hate speech, harassment and fear of being recognised as Jewish; these are some of the realities of being Jewish in the EU today. It appears to be getting worse, finds a major repeat survey of Jews from the EU Agency for Fundamental Rights, the largest ever of its kind worldwide. “Decades after the Holocaust, shocking and mounting levels of antisemitism continue to plague the EU,” says FRA Director Michael O’Flaherty. “Member States must take note and step up their efforts to prevent and combat antisemitism. Jewish people have a right to live freely, without hate and without fear for their safety.”
Categories: Law and Legal

Tim Berners-Lee We Need a Set of Guiding Principles That Can Define the Kind of Web We Want

The New York Times: As We Forge the Web of Tomorrow, We Need a Set of Guiding Principles That Can Define the Kind of Web We Want

Tim Berners-Lee: “All technologies come with risks. We drive cars despite the possibility of serious accidents. We take prescription drugs despite the danger of abuse and addiction. We build safeguards into new innovations so we can manage the risks while benefiting from the opportunities. The web is a global platform — its challenges stretch across borders and cultures. Just as the web was built by millions of people collaborating around the world, its future relies on our collective ability to make it a better tool for everyone.

As we forge the web of tomorrow, we need a set of guiding principles that can define the kind of web we want. Identifying these will not be easy — any agreement that covers a diverse group of countries, cultures and interests will never be. But I believe it’s possible to develop a set of basic ideals that we can all agree on, and that will make the web work better for everyone, including the 50 percent of the world’s population that has yet to come online.

Governments, companies and individuals all have unique roles to play. The World Wide Web Foundation, an organization I founded in 2009 to protect the web as a public good, has drawn up a set of core principles outlining the responsibilities that each party has to protect a web that serves all of humanity. We’re asking everyone to sign on to these principles and join us as we create a formal Contract for the Web in 2019. The principles specify that governments are responsible for connecting their citizens to an open web that respects their rights...”

Categories: Law and Legal

Voyager 2 Bids Adieu To The Heliosphere, Entering Interstellar Space

The milestone makes the 41-year-old NASA probe just the second human-made object, after Voyager 1, to reach such distant regions. Now, Voyager 2 is over 11 billion miles from the sun — and counting.

(Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Categories: Just News

How Congress Handles Sexual Harassment Claims Needs Fixing, But No Deal Yet On Bill

Leaders have vowed to pass a bill changing how Congress handles claims, but the House and Senate versions have big differences. Taxpayers are still paying for any settlements involving lawmakers.

(Image credit: Susan Walsh/AP)

Categories: Just News

Research Gaps Leave Doctors Guessing About Treatments For Pregnant Women

To protect a developing fetus from experimental drugs or treatments that might cause birth defects, pregnant women aren't included in many clinical trials. But that limits the safety evidence, too.

(Image credit: Maria Fabrizio for NPR)

Categories: Just News

Winter Storm Wallops Parts Of Southeastern U.S.

The National Weather Service warned of continued hazards as wintry conditions linger, particularly in Virginia and the Carolinas.

(Image credit: Steve Helber/AP)

Categories: Just News

Google+ Exposed Data of 52.5 Million Users and Will Shut Down in April

Wired Top Stories - Mon, 12/10/2018 - 14:19
A month after Google had already decided to shut down Google+, a new bug made its problems much, much worse.
Categories: Just News

Watch the New 'Godzilla: King of the Monsters' Trailer Now

Wired Top Stories - Mon, 12/10/2018 - 14:18
Plus: Aquaman just made a big splash in China, and Netflix is getting closer to an Oscar.
Categories: Just News

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